Posts from the ‘Shared Leadership’ Category

Local Leader Spotlight: Beverlyn Mendez, Easterseals Southern California

June 2020 / Sofia Van CleveA picture of a woman, Bev Mendez

At Blue Garnet, we are honored to partner with passionate leaders who are working hard to tackle the most pressing social inequities of our time. In our Local Leader Spotlights, we celebrate one of these wonderful leaders. This month, I (Sofia) chatted with Beverlyn Mendez, COO at Easterseals Southern California. Easterseals (hereafter, ESSC) works to change the way people define and view disability, and provides services to people with disabilities. Blue Garnet has been working with Bev and her team for the past two years on strategic business planning and implementation. We are continually inspired by Bev’s kindness and wisdom, and we hope to share some of that with you today!

Blue Garnet (hereafter, BG): Bev, you’ve worked at ESSC for 30 years, which is truly remarkable!  What’s your WHY? What makes you get up and go to work every morning?A snapshot of ESSC services
Bev: The ability to contribute and lead at Easterseals is very fulfilling to me personally; it really is a tremendous organization. Our team here has a combination of heart and talent that is so unique. This also describes our participants and families. There’s such an incredible synergy that goes on within the organization that makes it an amazing place to work.

I am also passionate about our services! ESSC supports people with disabilities throughout their lifespan (see Figure A.). Personally, inclusion and community living for people with disabilities also drives me. I went back to complete my doctoral degree several years ago and wrote my dissertation on the role of disability advocacy in deinstitutionalization. (more on this in a minute!)

BG: ESSC is meeting this moment with COVID-19 head on (ESSC blog here). Could you share about ESSC’s approach and innovation responding to the pandemic? And challenges you’re facing?
All our services have continued in unique ways. Like all organizations now, we’re leaping forward with technology in remote services and telehealth, like providing Applied Behavior Analysis, Speech, and Occupational Therapies and Social Skills Groups remotely. Across sectors, barriers to remote services have eroded. We’re moving forward to fill gaps and meet people’s needs where they are. That means reaching out to people in their home environment, and in the case of our Child Development Services, also providing resources like food, formula, and diapers to families to help meet basic needs during the crisis.

It is harder to reach some individuals during this time, though, including those who live in large congregate settings. They are more intensely affected by the pandemic; they’re more isolated and at higher risk of infection. We usually support these individuals to be active in their community through our Adult Day Services. In the midst of the pandemic, people who live in institutional settings are the hardest to reach, and that’s heartbreaking.

We have learned a lot, though, during this time. As people begin to go back to their regular routines, we want to carry forward what we’ve learned in remote services and telehealth. We want to continue and build on this creativity and new ways of connecting.

BG: Like this example you shared, we’ve been talking at BG about how the pandemic illuminates cracks in our systems to a broader audience—surfacing inequities in technology access, job security, affordable housing, food security, etc. How else has the quarantine revealed systemic inequities for people with disabilities?
Isolation is a significant issue for people with disabilities across all age groups, and it’s further intensified by the pandemic. ESSC supports people to be a part of their community, to engage with others, find jobs, and develop friendships. Obviously, this has been a challenge for everyone under the safer-at-home orders. But that isolation is not new for people with disabilities, and it’s just further exacerbated now. Similarly, families who have children at home (with and without disabilities) have been under far more stress during this time, and this is even more of a challenge for parents who have children with disabilities.

BG: In a way, the rest of the world is experiencing a glimpse of the challenges people with disabilities face daily. With this new empathy, is there anything our readers can do to support people with disabilities now or post-COVID?
Yes! We encourage everyone to be inclusive and to make all opportunities as accessible as possible (
resource here), including book clubs, classes, or other activities you’re organizing. At ESSC, our vision is to make Southern California the most inclusive place for people with disabilities to live, learn, work, and play. That means people can help make everything from schools, jobs, social experiences, and housing more inclusive.  We are passionate about what happens when people with disabilities are included.

BG: You just mentioned ESSC’s vision for impact developed last year: “By 2030, Southern California will be the most inclusive place for people with disabilities to live, learn, work, and play.” (info video here) How have you seen that start to play out? What has been the initial reaction you’ve received?
We were just wrapping up our launch of our new vision for impact, then COVID hit! The initial reaction has been extremely positive. During the pandemic, our whole org needed to pivot to support people in new and dynamic ways. We quickly realized, though, that we were putting all the guiding principles and strategies from our Strategic Business Plan to good use. We were excited to tell Blue Garnet “The plan fits! It’s working even during a global pandemic!” We’re living out our plan to expand our services to more people, provide leadership in the disabilities field, share learnings with other organizations, and change the way people view disabilities. The plan continues to guide us, and has sparked even more creativity across the organization. If the plan got us through a global pandemic, we know it will continue to serve us well.

BG: Wow, that’s so exciting to hear! Thank you for sharing that. After working with Blue Garnet for almost 2 years now, what was the most valuable part of your experience?
Two things come to mind. First, your strengths-based approach of looking at the whole organization. As all orgs, we do have areas we want to improve, but the strengths-focus resonated with us because it mirrors how we approach working with people with disabilities. Secondly, your level of engagement across our organization. BG reached deep to connect with our participants, families, community members, and funders. That process of reaching all our key stakeholders was extremely helpful for us! This input guided our strategies, and continues to guide us to make sure we’re doing what is most important for people with disabilities throughout Southern California.


We hope that learning more about Easterseals and the challenges people with disabilities face moves you to greater inclusion in your personal life, and louder advocacy for equal access across all spheres of society. Let’s be includers!

For more info on Bev or ESSC, click here. To connect with Blue Garnet, feel free to drop us an email at hello@bluegarnet.net.

Blue Garnet Alumni Spotlight: Giselle Timmerman

By Jessica Wong

December 2019

Curious about what Blue Garnet “alumni” are up to? We’re thrilled that most keep working for meaningful social change, often around the world! Today we want to highlight Giselle Timmerman, who joined the BG team in 2007 and continues to work as a Blue Garnet affiliate with positive psychology and strengths-based coaching. In 2012, Giselle moved to Barcelona, Spain with the love of her life. I (Jessica) caught up with Giselle at the end of October where she and her family were celebrating the castañada (chestnut festival) instead of Halloween!

Q: What have you been up to recently—besides raising two girls and exploring Europe?

A: Outside of being a wife and mother, I wear three additional hats. Globally, I’m an executive coach for Fortune 1000 companies whose headquarters are located all across the globe. I love using my gift of coaching to connect with managers and VPs from Silicon Valley, Boston, Taiwan, Australia and Ireland. Locally in Barcelona, I facilitate team development trainings on resilience skills, thriving through change and communication skills for managers. I also teach two classes at a local business school. For my “Managing Change and Organizational Health” class I was able to create my own curriculum and come up with new ideas on how to keep college students awake at 8:30 a.m.!

Q: Like us, we know you think of DEI (diversity, equity, and inclusion) as including strengths. Could you share more about how you think strengths play into the role of DEI in an organization?

A: It’s nearly impossible to be inclusive without appreciation of diversity. Diversity in background, education, gender, ethnicity, nationality, immigrant generation, working + thinking styles, religion/spirituality, skills and strengths.

To me, inclusiveness is leveraging differences to achieve better performance results. Our strengths are a natural way where uniqueness of thinking, feeling and being are valued. Fostering a sense of belonging starts with creating inclusive behaviors within a team that clearly magnifies a person’s uniqueness. “What is the purpose of my role in the team? What are the strengths I bring to the team? When have others noticed me using my strengths?”—questions like these can help an individual feel seen and connected.

All of this culminates into a better understanding of how individuals contribute to functioning as a well-rounded team.

 Q: We’re also thinking a lot about gratitude at this time of year. What advice do you have for practicing gratitude in your daily life?

A: I have a journal next to my bed where I often write down three good things that happened. There are oodles of research on the importance of gratitude for our daily and long-term happiness. The research tells us that the frequency with which you write in a gratitude journal isn’t so important, but that it’s more impactful if you write down why the good thing happened.

At “Friendsgiving” this year, I’ll bring out my vase full of “gratitude questions” (printed onto little pieces of paper). We pass this around at some point and everyone shares their answers out loud. It’s interesting to have specific questions and it’s fun to see how different cultures and nationalities respond to the questions (there are at least five different nationalities at most of these meals).

Q: What are you currently reading (or listening to)? Any recommendations for our fellow social impact geeks?

A: Other than SSIR, other resources I enjoy are: Work Life TED podcasts by Adam Grant, Berkeley’s Greater Good Center Newsletter and Squeezing the Orange podcast by Professor Dan Cable and Akin Omobitan.

Q: What do you miss the most about LA?

A: Mexican food and flip flops!

Q: Looking back, how does your time at Blue Garnet impact you today? What were some of the biggest learnings or takeaways from working at BG?

A: There are so many! One of the first things BG taught me was to ask the “so what?”  Now, within my work I’m pushing further to ask “now what?” Now, after a strategy has been decided upon, internally I’ll ask myself, “How can I help enable a behavior change within my clients that propels energy and commitment forward?”

At Blue Garnet, I also learned how to be more strategic with my thinking. I coach my clients to think through the big picture, connect the dots, and balance thinking about the short term versus the long term.

 


We’re thankful for Giselle, who significantly impacted the DNA of Blue Garnet by introducing us to positive psychology and the use of strengths back in 2007. We continue to engage Giselle in our existing work on culture with our clients. She also helps sharpen our practice around leveraging our individual strengths and working collaboratively as a team with diverse strengths. We’ll keep crossing our fingers that she’ll move back to Los Angeles someday soon. Until then, I think it’s time to visit her and explore Spain ourselves. Who’s in?

Feel free to reach out to us at hello@bluegarnet.net if you’d like to connect with Giselle and the BG team! Or feel free to comment with a note to Giselle and we’ll make sure it gets back to her.

Also, as we’re heading into the holidays, we encourage you to take some time to reflect on a couple of Giselle’s “gratitude questions” (BG has made our own vase of “gratitude questions” now, too!):

  • What about today has been better than yesterday?
  • Who has helped you become the person you are today, and what’s the top thing you’d thank them for?
  • What’s the best thing about your home, and have you taken time to enjoy it recently?

A brief moment for reflection and encouragement

By Way-Ting Chen

My 25th year college reunion was a couple of weeks ago (those of you who know the Blue Garnet founding story know my business partner Jenni Shen also hails from Swarthmore, and she was lucky to attend the reunion). I was disappointed to have missed it, and all the fun and nostalgia that comes with seeing people for the first time in decades, and (re)discovering who they have become in the meantime.

That said, while I missed the in-person fun, I caught some glimpses of the reunion virtually. One post by an onsite classmate included a comment made by the president of Swarthmore College, Valerie Smith (see right). And it gave me pause.

This call to action challenges us to turn inward and examine our own mindset, assumptions, biases and behaviors, even as we collaborate with others to make the world a better place.

Reading this filled me with pride at being part of an institution that would invoke this challenge. More importantly, it relates to an important point of view that Jenni and I intentionally built into our work at Blue Garnet:  No one goes at it alone. It’s the team’s blend of individual strengths that makes us powerful.

The work of social change asks a lot of each of us. And no matter how hard we may try, we alone are not the answer. It takes longer and more energy to do the internal homework that makes each of us comfortable with complexity and ambiguity, in order to effectively join forces with others in pursuit of social change. Yet, this is what we need to do – individually, as a team, and in collaboration with our community.

The process of effective systems change and business model transformations must be inclusive and can be trying. For me, when I am “stuck” in the struggle with no obvious way out, these words remind me that the conditions are ripe for creativity and, potentially, a new path forward:

“It may be that when we no longer know what to do,

we have come to our real work

And when we no longer know which way to go,

We have begun our real journey.

The mind that is not baffled is not employed.

The impeded stream is the one that sings.”

~ Wendell Barry

This summer let’s make time for internal reflection and external aspiration, so we can break through the struggle, and in community with our partners, all be the better for it.

 


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Millennials, the Future, and your Workplace

By Sofia Van Cleve and Shannon Johnson

At Blue Garnet, we have a motto: Think long-term, plan for the short term. We want people to think about strategies and solutions for not only today’s needs, but also needs in the future. To what extent do you know the future needs of your team? Your clients? Your community?

It’s a heady question, but we are here to help. While many people tend focus on the tech changes ahead— like the double-edged sword of innovation, technology, and Big Data— we urge you to also consider the changes in people ahead. Namely, Millennials. We think it’s worth your time to learn about this generation, so we compiled some of our learnings and takeaways from recent market research for a corporate strategy project, culture assessment for a regional nonprofit, and “DEI” discussions and workshops.

Millennials are already the largest generation in the labor force and they will become the future leaders of our organizations and our country. Millennials are:

  • Those born between 1981 and 1996*1
  • Now largest generation in the labor force—over 56 million working or looking for work2
  • More educated and racially diverse than previous generations1
  • Urban: they flock to urban areas for the lifestyle benefit and job opportunities, despite higher cost of living3. Also, more Millennial families live in cities than in suburbs4
  • Purpose-driven: companies that prioritize innovation and societal improvement via their business lower Millennial employee turnover and increase loyalty5

And they value…

  • Inclusion and diversity emphasized in the workplace—(including perspective, culture, and lifestyle)5
  • Flexibility: many attracted to the gig economy for flexible schedules and lure of supplemental pay5
  • Experiences: Several successful brands appeal to the younger audience using experience marketing, creating physical spaces for connection and community6

What does all this mean for your workplace? Between volunteers, board members, leaders, and staff – workplaces often are comprised of 4, if not 5, different generations. It can be challenging to work across them to create shared leadership. Be honest, have you ever heard or thought: “Ugh! Millennials are taking over!,” “Why do Millennials feel entitled to such extreme work flexibility?” or “Why can’t Millennials get off their phone for a second?”

It’s important to acknowledge (and even say out loud) that different generations have different norms, values, and “pet peeves”7. However, you can equip yourself and your team to work through the conflicts and determine how to best engage and employ workers across all generations.

Here are some questions7 to mull over at your next coffee break (or matcha break, in true Millennial fashion):

  • How can you expand your conversations to prepare for the future? By focusing and aligning discussions around your organization’s desired future impact, individuals across generations (not just Millennials!) are more likely to be engaged and motivated to make it happen. Pro Tip: make sure you start with together defining a common language about impact.
  • What does the future look like for the people you serve? How will you listen to, learn from, and include your constituents in addressing their changing needs? And what does this mean for your team?
  • To what extent have your leaders evolved their leadership styles? Emerging norms are for leaders to champion change and build a purposeful culture. Sometimes that means creating space for younger people to challenge, innovate, and teach.
  • How do your culture and services factor in generational preferences? How often do you look without blame from different perspectives at your strategies and workplace? In what ways do you seek, listen, and learn from the input of others? How do differing perspectives come to a decision in a healthy way?

We hope this entry sparks some creative thinking on building a healthy cross-generational culture at your organization. Let us know your reactions and experiences related to these questions?

 


Notes:
* According to Pew Research Center, though exact cutoff birth years for Millennials is contentious in generational theory
Source 7: “When Your Normal is My Trigger: Working Successfully Across Multiple Generations in the Workplace and the Link to White Privilege;” 5/21/19 presentation by Barbara Grant and Linda Nageotte at Washington Nonprofit Conference

A holiday hello from Way-Ting

As we near the end of 2018 and reflect on a very full year, I wanted to share a thought that I hope will carry you through the winter holidays and into the new year.

Back in September, at the Southern California Grantmakers conference, speaker john a. powell (Director, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society) spoke at great length about “Othering,” or what he defined as THE problem of the 21st Century. The intervention that combats Othering, he said, was Belonging. This resonated deeply with me, and has taken my thinking around diversity and inclusion to a new level.

We all long for a sense of belonging: familiarity, acceptance, and welcome. There is comfort and safety in knowing that you and your loved ones belong in your “tribe.” For my children, I hope this sense of belonging translates into the type of love and fearlessness that will move the world eventually.

In some sense, this is also what we strive for in the social sector—that those we serve would belong and thrive in their communities. From helping a child with a disability access therapeutic services, to developing the symbiotic connection between humans and our natural environment, to geeking out on how to institutionalize organizational capacity being built, Blue Garnet’s client work would not succeed without a “belonging,” of sorts, between us and our client partners.

Here at Blue Garnet, our network of relationships reflect a range of our intrinsic passions and “learner” interests. As a result, we belong to multiple “tribes,” or communities, so to speak. Whether it’s building an inclusive B-Corps community in Los Angeles, learning with NNCG’s popular DEI series, communing with our charter school peeps at ExEd, or contributing to the SCG evaluation and learning group, we are grateful to belong to diverse and intersecting communities of change makers.

My Swedish-American teammate Sofia tells me that the Swedish word for belong, “hör hemma,” has the root word “home.” In this holiday season, we hope that you “hör hemma” at home with your loved ones. Remember: we are all in this together—change, renewal, impact, justice. Let’s continue to strive for Belonging in 2019!

 

Happy holidays from all of us at Blue Garnet!

Way-Ting

 

Hearts of Garnet—Swarthmore Spotlight

By Way-Ting Chen

At Blue Garnet, we celebrate Thanksgiving together every year with a “leftovers lunch” the week following the holiday. At this year’s lunch, I was especially grateful for my (and Jenni’s!) alma mater, Swarthmore College, which played an integral role in the founding of Blue Garnet. Jenni and I met and quickly became friends at Swarthmore, where we honed our passions and abilities for lasting social change. After graduating, we were roommates in New York before moving to opposite coasts, going to business school, and landing at competing management consulting firms. Yet both of us felt called to make a difference in our community, together.

Blue Garnet was born in 2002, named with a nod to our beloved alma mater, whose symbol is The Garnet. As a semi-precious stone, the garnet also represents honesty, loyalty, and true friendship. We wanted to pay homage to Swarthmore, for its role in bringing me and Jenni together, and for helping to make us the change agents that we are. Not only that, when we started the firm, a rare garnet was found in Madagascar that in certain lights looked blue or green. We loved that idea of transformation and change—it worked beautifully. We are proud that Blue Garnet resembles a “mini-Swarthmore” through its ethos, team of learners, and small-by-design environment, which reminds us of where we came from and where we still want to go.

To learn more about our Blue Garnet origin story and Swarthmore, click here to read the Swarthmore College Bulletin article.

 

Jennifer Li Shen and Way-Ting Chen, co-founders of Blue Garnet

Blue Garnet’s pro tips for every social enterprise

 

By Sofia Van Cleve

Building an impactful social enterprise is far from easy. Through the ups and downs of Blue Garnet’s 15+ years working in social impact consulting and building our own social enterprise, we’ve learned some huge lessons in social entrepreneurship the hard way. In late April, we had the chance to talk about these learnings at Social Enterprise Alliance-LA’s new event, the Professional Services Night. Along with six other volunteering organizations—spanning social media, tech, law, and strategy consulting—Blue Garnet was happy to provide our pro bono help to the participants.

 

The creativity and passion we saw during the night got us super excited about new social enterprises in LA and wanting to share some tips with social entrepreneurs at large. Our co-founder, Way-Ting Chen, and the attendees explored how to improve their existing organizations or build their entrepreneurial dream with an eye for impact. Daniel Nash, a music composer and web designer, said Way-Ting’s help was “Phenomenal—I got the next steps for my business idea and steps down the line that I had no idea about. She helped me think ahead and know what resources I need to connect with and when I will need them.” We loved chatting with people like Daniel (and not just because he gave us the nicest compliment in the entire world!), but we don’t want to be stingy with our advice. So we’re going “open source” with our recommendations, hoping they’ll help other social enterprises out there, too.

 

If you want to maximize your impact and develop a high-performing organization, you need to make sure your organization has the following four components.

What You Need to Know About Impact as a Social Entrepreneur:

  1. Organizational clarity: Start with the end in mind. What impact are you trying to achieve through your social enterprise? What are the top three things YOU need to do really well to get there?
  2. Shared Leadership: Bring others on board to do this together and build your team to complement your strengths.
  3. Healthy Economics: Align your business model to your goals by focusing on who your target client is, what you offer them that truly makes a difference, and how you can afford to do so over time.
  4. Accountability for Results: Define your 10 key measures of success related to both impact and performance. Gather and analyze relevant data for insight, then iterate your strategy.

It’s okay if you don’t have all of these right now. The good news is that you can build them over time. If you have questions or want to build these for your organization, please contact us at sofia@bluegarnet.net.

 

We hope that the Services Night and Blue Garnet sharing these four tenants of impact will inspire social entrepreneurs in LA and beyond!

 


A special thanks to SEA-LA and Danny Brown for organizing this event, and West Monroe Partners for hosting! Thanks also to Daniel Nash for your incredibly kind words (we’re still blushing!).

All Aboard!: A Tool for Changemakers to Create Impact

by: Marcelo Pinell

Setting sail on the sea of social impact can be a daunting and overwhelming feat. Some, out of fear, have yet to leave shore while others have been tossed and turned by the challenging waves of the social sector. As the newest member to step on board Blue Garnet, I have been privileged to navigate these vast waters with a team of skilled and experienced social impact geeks who have steered through the rough seas, withstood the storms and driven the high winds of strategy to help leaders and their teams chart their ultimate impact.

Recently, I had the opportunity to witness these social impact geeks in action as I provided support for our Impact Formula Strategy Lab series. We had three eager organizations initially commit to investing in the development of their strategic thinking for three sessions spread across May through July. I was able to join the second session in June and watched the teams progress all the way up to a fourth session this November, which was later added due to popular demand. As it turns out, the work done during this Lab series was not what I expected. The following are some key insights that I walked away with after the Lab. I hope my reflections serve as a fresh perspective on the value of this Lab series in helping leaders create impact.

 

The right dosage can help leaders and their teams address their outcomes

Truth be told, not every nonprofit can afford consultants who can extensively work with them one-on-one for months on end. Plus, some nonprofits may not even need the full services of a consulting firm. Strategy Lab Session 4 PhotoThe Strategy Lab proved this point for me. Providing the correct dosage of support can help leaders and their teams address their outcomes. From May through July (and then once more in November), we trained and educated teams from three organizations. Once a month, they attended a half-day session in which they actively learned, participated, and worked through their Impact Formula. These teams would then go back to their organizations to work on assignments from the session and would return for another session the following month to gain more clarity and continue to build on their work. It was an iterative process that demanded hard work, but after the Lab series, these teams left with the tools and confidence they needed to head back as change agents for their organizations.

 

Consultants are not the changemakers, leaders are!

I’m sure you’ve heard this proverbial saying before: “Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime.” I began to see this proverb unfold before my eyes as I watched the Lab participants wrestle with strategic questions. More than giving them a business model, the Lab gave participants the time and space to work as a team with other people in their organization, which is typically difficult to do due to competing priorities and schedules. Additionally, the Lab allowed participants to gain awareness of a holistic view on achieving their “ends,” ask key learning questions and acquire strategic tools so they could think critically about their organization’s impact.

The assumption so often is that the professional consultant creates the impact. Though there is a place for consultants, no one can replace the passion and hours that these leaders give to the people they serve. If you can help equip a leader and deputize them as a change agent, then he or she can build a culture of change.

 

Reaching your intended impact is an intense, iterative and invaluable process

During the Lab, all of the teams got on board and steered through some serious strategic questions. As they sought to gain clarity, though, I noticed that their comfort articulating their theory of change interestingly and surprisingly took a slight dip during the second session. Strategy Lab Session 2 photoOn a scale of 1 (low) to 5 (high), the teams rated their comfort articulating their theory of change a 3.6 after the first session, which then dropped down to a 3.3 after session 2. By the third session, however, the rating jumped back up to a 3.8. The data seems to point to the reality of the intense and iterative nature in building discernment. From my perspective, the teams were initially shocked by some big waves regarding their theory of change, but they gained more confidence and clarity over time to create a vision for impact.

The teams were able to create a vision for impact not only because they iterated on their own work, but also because they learned from each organization’s different approach to tackling its Impact Statement. The value of peer learning was so great that the teams asked for a fourth session, which we completed last week. This additional session allowed the teams to check-in and hold each other accountable to their work.

Navigating the waters of social impact can be overwhelming, but the opportunity to help these organizations map out their impact was an invaluable journey for both them and me. I jumped on board the Lab and saw that it provides the right dosage to help these changemakers “zero in on impact.” Great job, teams! I look forward to the impact that comes forth as a result of your labor. Keep on sailing!

What do you get when you mix international development, problem solving, and a love of dance?

Blue Garnet is proud to introduce our newest pragmatic idealist, Leah Haynesworth! Leah is joining us as an Analyst, which means she’ll be rolling up her sleeves on the research and analysis that fuels our client work and on building our firm culture. Giselle Timmerman, a BG team member for almost nine years, sat down recently to welcome Leah and help you all get to know her. Here are some highlights from their conversation…

Giselle: Let’s start with your “why” – Why did you choose Blue Garnet?

Leah: For two reasons. One: I love solving complex problems and I’m very analytical, which draws me to consulting. Two: I’m passionate about social impact – I’ve worked in international development in both Uganda and New York and interned in corporate social responsibility (CSR) at NBCUniversal and The Walt Disney Company. So I feel that Blue Garnet offers me the perfect opportunity to apply my skills and experiences to help organizations better achieve social impact.

Giselle: Perfect combo indeed! What kinds of projects are you hoping to dig into?

Leah: Well, I’ve just started working with one of our corporate clients on Board leadership, so I’m eager to expand what I know about CSR. Blue Garnet also works with quite a few arts organizatinos, and I am also a trained ballet, modern, and jazz dancer, so it would be great to work with them. And I really am analytical by nature; it’s my default state. So I’m excited to apply that strength.

Giselle: The BG team takes developing our strengths seriously and we help clients do the same. You’ve taken a few strengths assessment surveys—apart from being analytical, what other strengths do you frequently rely on?

Leah: I loved taking these strength assessments and found them really interesting. Perseverance is one of my top strengths and I definitely am very goal-oriented. When I get involved in something, I have every intention of completing it.

It was a bit surprising to see that humor was my top VIA strength. I definitely like to be goofy and I tend to get along with different types of people, but it’s not always something I share right away. Fairness and judgment are also big ones for me. When I initially meet someone, I usually give them the benefit of the doubt.

Giselle: Where do you think your fairness comes from? Does your upbringing play a part?

Leah: I hadn’t really thought about it, but yes! My siblings are twins, so I had a front-row seat to an emphasis on sharing and fairness. 

Giselle: I’m curious to know more about your experience in Uganda. What was that like?

Leah: It’s a difficult experience to put into words. I really loved learning about international development in the field. And I learned something everyday, personal or professional—ranging from how to communicate in Luganda, the local language, to the sensitive issues surrounding working with commercial sex workers.

Giselle: So how did you shift from being an English major at Princeton University to being passionate about social impact?

Leah: While in undergrad, I studied in South Africa and volunteered as a teacher in a township that was in a poorer area of the city. I was deeply impacted by the dichotomy between rich and poor, blacks and whites. So then I was inspired to go back to Africa after I graduated and my passion for working in the social sector snowballed from there. That’s why I pursued work in Uganda and it’s also what eventually led me to USC’s Master of Public Administration program.

Giselle: I know that you collaborated on consulting projects with several local organizations while pursuing your MPA. A large part of Blue Garnet’s work is helping organizations make the shift to an impact thinking and doing mindset. In your own words, what does it mean for an organization to have a longer-term focus on impact?

Leah: I think it means that an organization is always looking to make its desired vision and strategy real. In other words, instead of only concentrating on social impact for specific projects, programs, and initiatives, an organization with a long-term focus on impact attempts to incorporate social impact into its organization overall and searches for ways to push the limits of its organizational capacity for social change.

Giselle: Finally, I have to ask, what’s your honest first impression of BG’s culture?

Leah: My third interview was with the entire team, which cemented my feeling that BG was the right place for me. I feel welcomed and part of a community of people who are smart and work hard, but don’t take themselves too seriously – that can be hard to find!

Click here to learn more about Leah and the rest of our team.

 

 

Setting (and achieving) goals take guts!

by: Giselle Timmerman and Taylor Chamberlin

Over the last several months, we’ve explored two of the three key components to setting and achieving individual goals (see developing a vision and establishing a plan). Today, let’s finish by tackling the final component: commitment and guts.

achieving goalsWhen you have developed a vision and established a plan to achieve it, the third step to effective goal-setting is to make these behavioral changes stick.

Much like a muscle, you can exhaust your willpower when you use too much of it. Plan ahead to conserve willpower and prevent yourself from slipping into situations that deter you from your goal. For instance, dieters can preempt future desires by knowing before entering a restaurant exactly what they will do and say when the dessert menu comes. To stay on track and accomplish your goal, identify a handful of obstacles that could block progress and decide exactly what you will do if these hurdles arise.

Another way to ensure perseverance towards your goal is to develop courage in small ways. To activate a “growth mindset,” you’ll need to manage fear of failure by courageously embracing mistakes as a necessary part of learning. Find creative ways to push yourself by exercising courage, and as an added benefit you will build your sense of self-efficacy, thus improving your ability to stick to your goal. I find Eleanor Roosevelt’s adage useful: Do something that scares you everyday.

Lastly, ensure that the activities you must do to achieve your become habits, which require far less willpower to maintain. To build new habits:

  1. Use cues that trigger your unconscious mind, such as a framed photo of mom next to the phone.
  2. Be honest with yourself every day on what you did to make progress. Ask yourself: How much effort did I put in today? How much progress did that create?
  3. Hook a new habit to an old one. This can be as simple as remembering to floss after you brush.
  4. Reduce the level of “activation energy” it takes to start your new habit. For example, put your running shoes right by the door, or keep your to do list visible on your desktop to easily tackle when you are waiting on hold.
  5. Enlist an accountability partner or coach (every great performer, from athletes to surgeons to managers now use them) and include them in the process of achieving your goals and building your habits.

There you have it – a researched and empirically tested way to dramatically improve your ability to achieve your goals. Blue Garnet works with clients to define and achieve success at the organizational level, but it’s a treat to share with you some tips for planning at the individual level.

Please let us know how you put your goals into practice, and what your experience has been with learning to achieve them. And of course if you have any questions, email us at hello@bluegarnet.net!


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