Posts from the ‘Organizational Performance’ Category

Groundwater problems, groundwater solutions

Sofia Van Cleve // July 2020

(This is part 2 in our racial justice essay series. Read more in our other posts: introduction, defining goals, getting proximate, taking stock)

 

Icons from The Noun Project

Imagine you are walking in the mountains (as I was, on a camping trip in the Eastern Sierras last week). You come across a lake. Sitting down on the banks of the lake to take in the view, you notice a dead fish. You think to yourself, “Odd. What happened to this fish? Did he not eat well? Did he not exercise enough? Was he a lazy fish, who didn’t work hard enough to provide for himself?”

Puzzled, you keep walking along the same lake and find hundreds more dead fish. This is eerie. Now you may consider, “Huh, could something be wrong with the whole lake? This many fish don’t just die by coincidence. Maybe this lake water is poisonous? Is there an algal bloom? Or toxic fertilizer runoff?” The problem appears bigger than one individual fish’s actions.

You keep hiking and encounter multiple lakes. You’re hoping for a different outcome so you can sit down and eat your packed lunch in peace. To your dismay and discomfort, you see that all the lakes have dead fish littering their banks! Now you’re angry. “Why are all these fish dying? What’s wrong with these lakes? How are they all getting poisoned?” The root of the problem is deeper than individual fish or individual lakes—it lies in the groundwater that seeps into all of the lakes.

The groundwater. So deep that you do not even see it. Hidden, but toxic. Below the surface, but extremely powerful. Poisoning all our lakes and killing many fish.

There is racism in the groundwater of our American society.

I first heard this allegory (and I’ll elaborate more below) at a Racial Equity Institute (REI) workshop in September 2019. Although I am White, since I am half-American and did not grow up in the US, I did not previously see myself as complicit in racism in America nor responsible for helping end it. At REI, I recognized that I am, and I’ve continued pursuing learning and action since. REI’s framework and teaching helped me see this. Its groundwater story communicates a complex reality in such a simple way, and we at Blue Garnet have incorporated it into how we talk about systems change. As we continue in our blog series on racial justice, we wanted to share it with you, too.

Racism affects every level and segment of American society. REI uses the above allegory to illustrate how underlying racism (the “groundwater”) feeds into all our systems and institutions (the “lakes”), harming individuals (the “fish”). Across “lakes,” we see disparate outcomes based on race. This is consistent and pervasive, but we have different language for this disparity in each sector (e.g., “health disparities” in healthcare, “racial disproportionality” in social services, “disproportionate minority contact” in juvenile justice, and “achievement gaps” in education). But the pattern of “fish” wellbeing is the same—Black Americans fare the worst, followed by Native American, Latinx, and Asian Americans varying in the middle, while White Americans experience the best outcomes. This same pattern is seen across the health, wealth, criminal justice, educational attainment, and other lakes.

Because we see this phenomenon across the board, the differences cannot be attributed to individuals’ behavior. It’s not about a “fish’s” nutrition, or exercise habits, or level of resilience, or if they attend financial coaching. Socioeconomic status does not explain these differences, either. For example, “White women with a high school diploma have lower infant mortality rates than Black women with MAs, JDs or PhD’s,” (CDC, see REI for more examples). Rather, these differences stem from “a history of structuring opportunity for certain groups while denying others,” according to REI’s Reiney Lin. REI’s whitepaper goes in depth on the history and current reality of racism in America.

So how do we do something about systemic racism? Start by considering and working toward groundwater solutions, even as we continue addressing injustices on every level. As a society, we still need to support individual “fish”– people are hungry today, so we do need food banks and meal servings. Many people don’t have a roof over their heads, so we need shelters for the unhoused. At the same time, the symptoms and suffering we see in individuals often stem from a deeper disease that is generational, societal, and institutional. To ensure a thriving, healthier population in the future, we also need groundwater solutions. We can’t treat only symptoms when the sickness goes unchecked. We need food banks and fair wages and hiring reform. Whatever level and area of social change you work in, you cannot avoid the root causes of your community’s pain.

To further immerse yourself in “groundwater” thinking:

  • Start by tuning into an REI’s virtual workshop on “The Groundwater Approach.” Their sessions this week filled up quickly, but sign up for their newsletter to hear about upcoming events. You can also read their whitepaper, full of data and research
  • Practice drilling down to an issue’s root cause with the “The 5 Why’s” approach. This management technique asks “why” of every layer of a problem until you reach its origin
  • Consider your own organization, and ask yourself:
    • What root causes contribute to the problems I see in my community, and how does this relate to my organization’s mission?
    • What power, knowledge, resources, and strengths do I, or my organization, have to help solve that root cause? Which can we grow in?
    • If we don’t possess these, who can we partner with, fund, or collaborate with that is tackling the systemic issues?
    • Where can I transition part of my organization’s efforts to tackle systems change? Where can I engage as an individual?
  • Shameless plug: keep reading the BG essay series on racial justice! We’ll dive deeper into some of the questions raised here

What resources and frameworks have guided your thinking on racial equity and systems change? Additionally, if you want to chat more with us about our racial justice journey, or how we can partner with you in yours, please contact us at hello@bluegarnet.net


Sources: Specific articles and Groundwater allegory drawn from:
Hayes-Greene, Deena, and Bayard P. Love. The Groundwater Approach: Building a Practical Understanding of Structural Racism. The Racial Equity Institute. 2018

“Phase 1 Workshop.” Hosted by Racial Equity Institute in Westwood, California. September 14-15, 2019.

Planning for an Uncertain Future

Way-Ting Chen

April 2020

Only three weeks ago, we were holding in-person design sessions, meeting for coffee, and chillin’ out after work together. How quickly things have changed. Now, we live in a heightened state of physical isolation and general uncertainty.

When our “todays” are evolving so rapidly, it’s natural to ask questions about our “tomorrows.” What will happen to… our organization and its work? …the vulnerable we support and those in community with us? …the physical, mental, and financial health of our staff and volunteers? …this year’s grantmaking or programmatic budget and future sustainability?  Even… what will happen to me? How do I manage work and high-energy kids at home, in the small space we share? And for all of us: How long will this last? When will we know that the crisis is over?  When can we be in each other’s presence again?

Do you relate to (some of) these questions?? Though they can be anxiety-inducing, they are also real and valid. Our vulnerability in voicing them can be a powerful tool. In asking the question, we pinpoint issues of importance and highlight areas where we face the greatest ambiguity. Pandemic or not, we would never have the answers to all of these questions at once.

That said, one thing we CAN begin to address, is what MIGHT happen. And often, when we start thinking in terms of what MIGHT happen, we start to flesh out ways our tomorrows might transpire, organize them into related groupings, and spot areas where we have some degree of influence over the results. This is what we call “scenario planning.” 

Scenario planning allows us to imagine and consider multiple possible futures, then make judgement and plans for each, where possible. This strategic thinking helps to bring structure and focus to uncertain times and draw insights into how we deal with the future. Ideally, we all have the discipline and time to do this scenario planning in advance of a crisis (you know us, we’re planners at core!). That said, tackling scenario planning during times of upheaval builds clarity for us today and confidence to respond quickly as situations evolve.

To give you a sense for what scenario planning entails, we’d like to offer some big-picture questions that can help focus your path forward:

  1. What are 3-5 ways this year could unfold? This is a generative question, so don’t be afraid to think broadly. It can help to think in terms of best- and worst-case scenarios. Or feel free to adapt to options, or scenarios, that make the most sense for you.
  2. What are key implications for each scenario? If you go down each path, what might this mean for people, budget, operations, etc? What actions would you need to take, by when?
  3. How will you know what scenario you are in? What are the markers that trigger change, or indicators that point toward needed adjustment? Is it a demand level? Available staffing? Financial milestone?
  4. What is the likelihood of each scenario happening, based on what you know now? Start working toward the most likely scenario and be on the lookout for changes in those markers.

If the situation changes (which it likely will), you’ve already thought through what you need to do, and can transition to the more pertinent scenario. A few years into the Great Recession, we had a former client tell us that they realized they were in “Scenario B,” and in short order, the Board and staff leadership adopted “Plan B.” Past planning using scenarios with us allowed them to recognize the signs and quickly pivot with less anxiety.

If you’d like a little more reading on the topic, here’s a McKinsey article about scenario planning. While focused on the corporate sector, this article gives further language to the level of uncertainty we encounter and how to plan accordingly.

Finally, please remember that you are not alone in facing the challenges of today. Thousands of organizations and millions of individuals across the country are grappling with these very same questions – as are we at Blue Garnet. While we may not have all the answers, we are doing our part to support our community through this time, in the best way we know how.

With this, we want to try something new and host a virtual Coffee & Conversation on the topic of scenario planning. We’re gauging interest now, so please email us hello@bluegarnet.net to let us know if you are interested, then we work to find a mutually convenient date!

If you have other ideas for how we can be of help, please comment below our shoot us an email.

Be safe and stay healthy, everyone.

Best,

Way-Ting

Designing with the “End” in Mind

By Seimi Park, Summer Intern

If you enjoy strategy and problem solving as much as we do here at Blue Garnet, odds are that you’re familiar with the term “design thinking.”

Design thinking began as a buzzword in consumer product spaces, at companies like Apple and Nike. In recent years, however, the methodology has been more openly embraced by organizations for which the application of design concepts might seem less intuitive.

The relevance of “design” may not be apparent in the nonprofit and social impact sectors. However,  many design thinking principles are innate to the work of social change organizations. So, what exactly is design thinking and how is it applied in the social sector?

Design thinking is a framework for understanding complex problems and creating innovative, human-centered solutions. Unlike most problem-solving methods, design thinking begins with the end in mind – focusing on solutions and the way that things could be, rather than focusing on problems and the way that things currently are.

The design thinking methodology can be captured in five key stages: empathize, define, ideate, prototype, and test.

  • Empathize: The design thinking process begins with engaging your end-users or beneficiaries through conversation to develop a richer understanding of their experiences, emotions, needs, and desires. E.g. What are your community members saying about what they really need from your services?
  • Define: After gathering insights from your conversations with your end-users, develop an action-oriented problem statement that can be used as a foundation for brainstorming. g. How can you boil down all the point points you heard into prioritized needs?
  • Ideate: Spend some time “dreaming up” potential solutions – be creative and think outside the box! E.g. What would you do for and with your client, if you had unlimited resources and abundant staff?
  • Prototype: Ask yourself what your potential solutions could look like and translate this vision into something tangible by building models or mock-ups. E.g. Can you test out a pilot project of a new program or service you brainstormed?
  • Test: Get feedback from your users on what works and more importantly, what needs improvement. E.g. How did the pilot project meet the community needs identified?

While the methodology can be broken down into these five stages, the process of design thinking is never quite complete, requiring constant iteration. In other words, you’ll likely go through the process multiple times before you generate a viable solution.

The Blue Garnet team after an energizing brainstorming session on ways we can continue to employ design thinking in our work

Here are a few examples of how Blue Garnet uses design thinking principles in our work:

  • People come first. In order to maximize our impact, we focus on better understanding our clients and the communities that they serve. Our work is centered on developing meaningful relations with our clients, learning about the experiences of stakeholders, and putting ourselves in the shoes of the Southern California community through innovative techniques, such as empathy mapping.
  • Starting with the end in mind. When we work with clients, we begin by asking questions: What social impact are you hoping to achieve? How will you measure your impact? What do you need to hone to make this impact possible? We believe that defining your desired impact is critical to ensuring the sustainability and efficacy of your organization. 
  • In order to truly think outside of the box, assume nothing. Don’t limit yourself to conventionality and that which has already been done. Every client is unique. We don’t problem-solve by relying on precedent – rather, we problem-solve by learning from our clients about their individual needs and working through the defining and brainstorming stages of the design thinking process 
  • Continuously iterate. Always ask yourself, “What can we do better?” There is rarely a definitive “end” point to our work in the social impact space. As a “team of learners,” we are continuously thinking of ways to better support our clients and communities. 

At our social impact consulting firm, human-centered problem solving has been woven into the Blue Garnet-DNA. As we continue learning and growing, we would love to hear from you. How are you thinking about design thinking principles in your own organization? Let us know your thoughts at hello@bluegarnet.net.

 

 

Further resources on Design Thinking:

Design Thinking for Greater Good: Innovation in the Social Sector. Liedtka, Salzman, and Azer https://www.amazon.com/Design-Thinking-Greater-Good-Innovation-ebook/dp/B0719PRBM5

“Bringing Design Thinking To Social Problems, Ideo.org Focuses on the People in Need.” Pastorek https://www.fastcompany.com/3020789/bringing-design-thinking-to-social-problems-ideoorg-focuses-on-the-people-

“Design Thinking for Social Innovation.” Brown and Wyatt https://ssir.org/articles/entry/design_thinking_for_social_innovation

All Aboard!: A Tool for Changemakers to Create Impact

by: Marcelo Pinell

Setting sail on the sea of social impact can be a daunting and overwhelming feat. Some, out of fear, have yet to leave shore while others have been tossed and turned by the challenging waves of the social sector. As the newest member to step on board Blue Garnet, I have been privileged to navigate these vast waters with a team of skilled and experienced social impact geeks who have steered through the rough seas, withstood the storms and driven the high winds of strategy to help leaders and their teams chart their ultimate impact.

Recently, I had the opportunity to witness these social impact geeks in action as I provided support for our Impact Formula Strategy Lab series. We had three eager organizations initially commit to investing in the development of their strategic thinking for three sessions spread across May through July. I was able to join the second session in June and watched the teams progress all the way up to a fourth session this November, which was later added due to popular demand. As it turns out, the work done during this Lab series was not what I expected. The following are some key insights that I walked away with after the Lab. I hope my reflections serve as a fresh perspective on the value of this Lab series in helping leaders create impact.

 

The right dosage can help leaders and their teams address their outcomes

Truth be told, not every nonprofit can afford consultants who can extensively work with them one-on-one for months on end. Plus, some nonprofits may not even need the full services of a consulting firm. Strategy Lab Session 4 PhotoThe Strategy Lab proved this point for me. Providing the correct dosage of support can help leaders and their teams address their outcomes. From May through July (and then once more in November), we trained and educated teams from three organizations. Once a month, they attended a half-day session in which they actively learned, participated, and worked through their Impact Formula. These teams would then go back to their organizations to work on assignments from the session and would return for another session the following month to gain more clarity and continue to build on their work. It was an iterative process that demanded hard work, but after the Lab series, these teams left with the tools and confidence they needed to head back as change agents for their organizations.

 

Consultants are not the changemakers, leaders are!

I’m sure you’ve heard this proverbial saying before: “Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime.” I began to see this proverb unfold before my eyes as I watched the Lab participants wrestle with strategic questions. More than giving them a business model, the Lab gave participants the time and space to work as a team with other people in their organization, which is typically difficult to do due to competing priorities and schedules. Additionally, the Lab allowed participants to gain awareness of a holistic view on achieving their “ends,” ask key learning questions and acquire strategic tools so they could think critically about their organization’s impact.

The assumption so often is that the professional consultant creates the impact. Though there is a place for consultants, no one can replace the passion and hours that these leaders give to the people they serve. If you can help equip a leader and deputize them as a change agent, then he or she can build a culture of change.

 

Reaching your intended impact is an intense, iterative and invaluable process

During the Lab, all of the teams got on board and steered through some serious strategic questions. As they sought to gain clarity, though, I noticed that their comfort articulating their theory of change interestingly and surprisingly took a slight dip during the second session. Strategy Lab Session 2 photoOn a scale of 1 (low) to 5 (high), the teams rated their comfort articulating their theory of change a 3.6 after the first session, which then dropped down to a 3.3 after session 2. By the third session, however, the rating jumped back up to a 3.8. The data seems to point to the reality of the intense and iterative nature in building discernment. From my perspective, the teams were initially shocked by some big waves regarding their theory of change, but they gained more confidence and clarity over time to create a vision for impact.

The teams were able to create a vision for impact not only because they iterated on their own work, but also because they learned from each organization’s different approach to tackling its Impact Statement. The value of peer learning was so great that the teams asked for a fourth session, which we completed last week. This additional session allowed the teams to check-in and hold each other accountable to their work.

Navigating the waters of social impact can be overwhelming, but the opportunity to help these organizations map out their impact was an invaluable journey for both them and me. I jumped on board the Lab and saw that it provides the right dosage to help these changemakers “zero in on impact.” Great job, teams! I look forward to the impact that comes forth as a result of your labor. Keep on sailing!

Making Strategic Planning Real

by: Shannon Johnson

It’s time to get real…about making social impact in Los Angeles. That’s exactly what The John Gogian Family Foundation did on January 27th, 2016, in Torrance, CA. Lindsey Stammerjohn, Executive Director, understands that long-term sustainable social change doesn’t just happen – it needs to be carefully planned. So she and the foundation stepped up to the plate and hosted a forum for all their grantees (70+ in attendance, their highest ever) focused on “Making Strategic Business Planning Real.” Pretty awesome, huh? We thought so too.

I don’t mean to be Debbie Downer, but strategic business planning is (and should be) hard. You are asking and answering tough, strategic qDilys Garciauestions. Want to know what helps? Learning from others who have been there. That’s why we interviewed Dilys Tosteson Garcia, Executive Director at Court Appointed Special Advocates Los Angeles (CASA), throughout the forum. She candidly painted a real-life picture of the struggles and triumphs in her organization’s strategic planning process. Their process was of particular interest to the attendees as she and her team developed a bold and visionary plan to TRIPLE their impact while simultaneously undergoing a complete shift in their funding model. In the process, they strengthened their program model, invested in data systems and elevated their internal culture!

Thinking of starting a strategic planning process? As we shared during the forum, here are few tips to keep in mind:

  • A Strategic Business Plan becomes REAL when you not only define your desired impact in a measurable way but also align it with your business model, make sure you can afford it, develop a plan for how you’re going to implement it, measure your progress, learn along the way, and hold yourself accountable to it. PS – when all is said and done, it is a very, very powerful and beautiful thing and worth all the effort!

test

  • Process is as important as content. Building a strategic business plan takes time, but it can be “chunked” out into 3 main steps:

Where are we today?

  • Engaging the “right” people at the “right” time is critical. Think about whom, when, and how different stakeholders (e.g. Board, staff, clients, funders, supporters) should be involved. Our motto: involve “early and often.”
  • Your plan should be adaptive. Strategies and plan can (and should) change over time. (Read more about emergent strategies here.)

A big thank you to The John Gogian Family Foundation, Dilys Tosteson Garcia, and all the inspiring nonprofit leaders who attended for an engaging, productive day!

Are you interested in Making Strategic Business Planning Real? Click here to learn more about Blue Garnet’s Impact Accelerator Strategy Labs.

Local Leader Spotlight: Colleen Mensel on sharpening your business model

El Viento provides children and young adults with opportunities for success in life through long-term relationships based upon: Mutual Trust and Respect, Exemplary Character, Skills Building, Leadership, Teamwork, and Learning. El Viento Foundation’s success will be measured by the happiness and fulfillment of our participants.

El Viento provides children and young adults with opportunities for success through long-term relationships. El Viento Foundation’s success is measured by the happiness and fulfillment of its participants.

What does it take for an organization to move from good to truly exceptional? For starters, it takes leaders willing to tackle tough strategic questions. Colleen Mensel, President and Chief Executive Officer of El Viento, is one such leader.

Colleen, along with Julie Taber, El Viento’s Operations Manager, participated in a bootcamp on “Sharpening Your Business Model” taught by Blue Garnet and sponsored by the Fieldstone Foundation. The bootcamp focused on how impact and business models fit together, what the key components of a business model are, and how to measure success. Simply put, the bootcamp experience “was something to help us with our compass and how to move forward.” When we spoke with Colleen in May, she shared why this process has mattered so much.

Taking an integrated view

Blue Garnet: Ultimately, why did you feel it was important to spend time sharpening your business model?

Colleen: When you look at how typical nonprofits move forward with their “business plans,” they really see many different plans, rather than seeing how they are all related on a more basic level. We now have an overarching model and everything plugs into that. We were able to share our model with our board and get their buy-in, and to take this model to our funders.[1]

Blue Garnet: Why was Board engagement in this process so essential?

Colleen: We were able to set realistic goals, down to the level of annual performance objectives. Before, our dashboard was all financial; now we are looking at multiple moving parts of the organization (e.g. kids’ retention rates, GPA). We’ve worked with the board to understand that our business model includes every aspect of the organization, not just finances.

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Developing a growth mindset, creating mindshifts

Blue Garnet: Having an overarching business model really seems to have shifted the way you and your organization think.

Colleen: Yes, it has. The business model [framework] helped us look at our core competencies and refine what we think is good, but good wasn’t enough for us. We are constantly asking ourselves how we can be better. This model integrates all the work we do, and following it has helped us to grow. In fact, it has helped us better think through future growth – we can see where we are and use the model to help us grow in different areas. We’ve decided to put together an Academy, and we went back to the [business model] framework to help us think through this decision.

Blue Garnet: Can you give me another example?

Colleen: We’ve looked differently at our measures. We make a 10-year commitment to our kids, and over the years we used to lose about 50%, which most thought was a good retention rate. But we asked how we could become better. The business model helped us look at our core competencies, especially how we interact with the students, and as a result last year our retention rate was 94%.

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Having the courage to change, taking risks

Blue Garnet: What does it mean to you to be an “impact thinker”?[2]

Colleen: You have to be aware of the dollars that are coming in so you can make the most of that generosity. If you aren’t an impact thinker, you’re doing a disservice to your contributors. We encourage everyone at El Viento to be impact thinkers, from staff to board to the people we collaborate with out in the community. We have to make the most out of the tools, time, and dollars we have—knowing that has made us a little braver.

Blue Garnet: Were there any challenges to making this shift?

Colleen: Impact thinking means always looking, having an idea of where you want to be, but also having the courage to change to improve. People questioned our change, and yet we pushed forward and now are in a better place. A year later, they can see the improvements. Working on our business model helped forge the way.

Blue Garnet: Can you share a specific benefit of this change?

Colleen: We looked closely at what we were doing. For example, we decided to do fewer, more meaningful and educational field trips. That was a hard change, but everyone sees the benefits now. Having a tool for assessing decisions, particularly with staff, helps you analyze and understand what you’re doing to be most effective.

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Seizing opportunities

Blue Garnet: What were some other tangible actions or results from this work?

Colleen: We now use our business model as a tool to assess decisions. We have used our model to evaluate a new opportunity that arose to get reimbursed from school districts for the tutoring we provide. Going back to the model helped us understand that we could take this opportunity and make it a social enterprise. We are also doing a pilot of another social enterprise and are looking at tailoring the learning experience to be more proactive rather than reactive. We are using our business model to understand how what we learn from this pilot fits into El Viento’s long-term strategy for impact. Having the basics on how to assess these opportunities is very helpful.

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We applaud Colleen for openly and generously sharing part of her leadership journey, as well as to El Viento for its tenacious commitment to helping children and young adults succeed. If you would like to dive deeper into how exceptional funders and nonprofit leaders become better “impact doers,” check your inbox in a few weeks for our Impact Doing Briefing or sign up to learn more about one of our upcoming Impact Accelerator workshops.

Related Links and Resources

  1. How El Viento makes a difference
  2. Blue Garnet’s Impact Accelerator Workshops
  3. Connect with El Viento on Twitter (@ElVientoFndtn)

[1] Blue Garnet defines three components of an organization’s business model: 1) what you do, 2) for whom you do it, 3) how you afford it.

[2] See Blue Garnet’s Impact Thinking Briefing for more on how to be an “impact thinker.” Link to briefing: Blue Garnet’s Impact Thinking Briefing.

The “Un-sexy” Work of Making Strategy Real

by Way-Ting Chen (December 19, 2014)

At heart, I am a strategist. I have a bit of a confession to make: over the course of years, I have witnessed it over and over again—in my years as a research analyst, a corporate management consultant, and now a social entrepreneur. But despite having the soul of a strategist, I have found what I am about to share with you to be undeniably true.

Strategy matters. It matters a lot. Strategy that bridges aspiration with a grounding in what it takes to make that strategy happen is the most effective of all. But here’s the secret that “strategy consultants” don’t always tell you: strategy means nothing if you can’t make it real. How you do something will define success for what it is you set out to do. In the end, implementation trumps strategy every time.

But do not fear, my strategy-minded friends. Implementation planning (i.e. pacing and calibration of how to achieve your strategy) builds the bridge between what you’ll do and how you’ll do it, but its power goes beyond articulating how you are going to make your strategy real. If done as part of a thorough strategic planning process, it can help inform the strategy too. It’s not linear; rather, it is an iterative conversation. And it makes what you’re trying to do more likely to come true.

Think of it this way: it starts with the planning. Implementation happens in one form or another whether or not we plan intentionally for it, and I’ve seen my fill of “strategic plans” that define the what (e.g., strategy) without any reference to the how (sustaining the business model, organizational implications, implementation roadmap, etc.).

One of the leading strategy firms in the world, McKinsey, wrote about implementation of corporate strategy, but I believe it applies to the field of social impact as well: “good implementers retain more value at every stage of the process than poor implementers do, and the[ir] impact is significant.”

To be clear, I’m not advocating for implementation without strategy. Nor am I advocating for implementation planning without strategic planning. That would be like trying to map directions without knowing where it is you’re trying to go.

What I believe in is defining strategy in tandem with an implementation roadmap. Let strategy frame implementation, and let implementation ground strategy. When this intentionally and methodically occurs during the planning process, you get increased organizational clarity, healthier economics to sustain your organization, and greater accountability to drive results.

Check out McKinsey’s article to learn more about their findings regarding what sustains strategy throughout implementation. We want to know: what has been your experience with implementation and planning for implementation? How much have you invested in implementation planning has it related to your organization’s strategy? Tell us in the comments section or by emailing hello@bluegarnet.net!

Nurture Your Inner Learner With Three McAdam Award Finalists

by Taylor Chamberlin 9/1/14 (updated 10/8/14)

Have you read any inspiring, insightful, or downright useful books on nonprofit management lately? If so, odds are it was a nominee  for The Terry McAdam Book Award. This annual award program, which honors Terry McAdam, who devoted his life to improving the nonprofit management field, selects the nonprofit sector book that best shares knowledge and builds the social change movement. Blue Garnet’s Jennifer Shen is thrilled to be a member of the selection committee, which announced a winning nominee at The Alliance for Nonprofit Management National Conference on September 17-19th in Austin, Texas.

We at Blue Garnet have an innate love of learning, so we strive to cultivate a similar curiosity in others. That means it’s that time of year once again (see last year’s posts here and here) to nurture your inner learner by sharing the 2014 McAdam Book Award finalists.

Creating Value in Nonprofit-Business Collaborations book coverCreating Value in Nonprofit-Business Collaborations: New Thinking and Practice (by James E. Austin and M. May Seitanidi)

Everywhere you turn, the nonprofit sector is buzzing about how collaboration can improve the work that we do. This timely and important contribution answers the all-important question, “What the heck is a value proposition?”, then gives practical advice for thinking about partnerships through a collaborative value framework. Austin and Seitanidi have a “pracademic” approach, sharing insights and guidance by balancing case studies, evidence of effectiveness, and storytelling. You can read more about transformational nonprofit-business partnerships by purchasing their book here.

Content Marketing for Nonprofits Book Cover

Content Marketing for Nonprofits: A Communications Map for Engaging Your Community, Becoming a Favorite Cause, and Raising More Money (by Kivi Leroux Miller)

In this outcomes-focused world, it is critical to know how to effectively share your story. Content Marketing for Nonprofits can serve as your handbook on creating a communication strategy that will help you climb up the “engagement ladder” to inspire behavioral change. Many organizations find creating a marketing strategy intimidating, but Miller’s approach makes communications mapping accessible.  You can purchase Content Marketing for Nonprofits here!

 The Last Virtual Volunteering Guidebook book coverThe Last Virtual Volunteering Guidebook: Fully Integrating Online Service into Volunteer Involvemen(by Jayne Cravens)

Volunteers are critical to the success of many nonprofits, but all too often organizations don’t have a strategy in place for volunteer management. We believe that meaningful volunteer engagement can become a strategic advantage– we even highlighted our partnership with a foundation helping to build volunteer management capacity in our last newsletter. We were heartened to see a guidebook with up-to-date insights and advice on integrating online activities into volunteer management, especially considering the rapid change and innovation of the last decade. If you seek a easy-to-use and forward-thinking guide to integrated volunteer involvement, look no further! You can purchase The Last Virtual Volunteering Guidebook here.

Now it’s your turn: Have you read anything lately that you think deserves an award? What do you think about the 2014 McAdam Book Award finalists? Let us know by commenting below!

Update: the winner is…drumroll please… Kivi Leroux Miller for Content Marketing for Nonprofits! Read more about her work and this year’s McAdam Book Awards here. Congrats Kivi!

How to Be Exceptional in 4 Easy Steps

You work hard to create social change in your communities, for those most in need and those who have fallen through traditional safety nets in our society. But at some point, you need more than the passion and commitment that drive your work.

Challenges emerge. You plateau. It happens to all of us.

So what does it take to achieve great impact over good enough?

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