Set a vision, then make your individual goals “SMART-EST”

by: Giselle Timmerman and Taylor Chamberlin

business08It’s hard to believe, but we are already more than halfway through 2015. Are you coasting along with your New Year’s resolutions? Or, like over a third of all Americans, did you give up before the making it through January[1] (no judgment, we promise)? Regardless, we believe the principles of effective organizational goals apply to you as an individual, so we’d like to share some surefire strategies for setting and following through on your goals.

The research is clear: those who set effective goals are happier and more successful in their personal and professional lives. There are three key components to setting and achieving individual goals: developing a vision, establishing a plan, and committing to the journey. We’ll explore each of these components over the course of this summer but today, let’s tackle part one: developing a vision.

Visioning

Select a goal you want to accomplish. To make sure it is right for you right now, test it using the following three filters:

  1. Are you excited and motived to accomplish it? If your motivation is below a 7 on a 10-point scale, consider revising or selecting a different goal.
  2. Does this goal help you to be who you really want to be?
  3. Do you have the skills and resources to start making progress tomorrow? If your answer is not a solid “Yes!” then this is where the help of a coach can be extremely useful.

You may have heard of “SMART” goals, but to be exceptional, we recommend you make your goal the SMARTEST it can be:

Specific – Clear and detailed (e.g., call my sister weekly vs. have a better relationship with my sister).
Measurable –Criteria and tools to monitor progress (e.g., run a 5k by May vs. get more exercise).
Attainable – Achievable, but still challenging. Otherwise, this goal is nothing more than a wish or dream.
Realistic – Logical, given your time, money, resources, and skills.
Time-bound – Limited by a deadline, otherwise you may sow the seeds of procrastination.
Emotional – Triggers intrinsic motivation. Does the goal give you goose bumps when you think of achieving it?
Significant – Should contain words of special meaning. What is your “why”? Why would you regret not accomplishing your goal?
Toward – Invokes a growth mindset by focusing on how you can learn. A growth mindset means effort matters, making challenges or setbacks easier to deal with.

After running your goal through the three filters and making it “SMARTEST,” you should have something that is ready to polish. Goals that are vivid are more compelling and thus more likely to be achieved, so take ten minutes to detail what you are striving for. What does accomplishing this goal look like? Feel like? How would your life be different if you were doing this thing all of the time?

For example, if you’re excited, motivated, and ready to train for a triathlon, close your eyes and imagine crossing the finish line at the end of the race. Envision the crowds, imagine your tired muscles, and picture displaying your medal prominently at your house. Then write down your vivid and compelling vision, along with your succinct goal statement.

Once you have polished your goal into a meaningful statement (worthy of showcasing as a new your desktop background), you’ve completed part one! Let us know how you decided what your goals for 2015 are in the comments below.

[1] Franklin Covey Survey, 2008, n=15,031

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